Author Topic: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps  (Read 7131 times)

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Offline Outoftowner

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #20 on: May 03, 2014, 09:26:58 AM »
I think that mink are little more than eating machines, especially when they have young, which i think is most of the time. If food runs out then they'll move on but their diet is extensive so they will change to the next easiest catch. By water, this includes fish, crayfish and molluscs.
The mink, if left to its own devices, will destroy British wildlife so they must be eradicated.
Unfortunately many "wildlife lovers" believe that predators should be allowed to thrive in what they believe is the natural world but in fact is far from natural.
What's it all about?

Offline Muggins

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #21 on: May 03, 2014, 09:36:57 AM »
Thanks I am aware and understand the need to remove  said species, including plants, well meaning people on that one being the bane of my life at present!   Also taken part in removing said offending aliens. 

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Offline Spunkymonkey

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #22 on: May 03, 2014, 11:32:06 AM »
........ well meaning people on that one being the bane of my life at present! 

Let's not forget that it was a few well meaning people that released these mink in to the wild in the first place.

Offline Tobes

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #23 on: May 03, 2014, 12:12:47 PM »
Well, not exactly Spunky. Though lots were released by idiotic animal rights 'bunny fascists', enough also escaped through accident and incompetence on behalf of the mink farmers, that their running eventual riot was inevitable...
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Offline I Could Do That

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #24 on: May 04, 2014, 08:23:23 AM »
Going back to this bit....

Quote
"On a 560m (1,840ft) section of canal, we assumed a population of around 45 to 50 voles and caught around 40 animals - which is a decent number."
(major under-statement!!)

In weeks, 40 voles were captured, along with 20 more on an old section of canal running through Studley Grange. (Junction 16 garden centre)

..... Makes a mockery of the notion that the remaining voles will "re-colonise" as there may not be any remaining
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Offline Muggins

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #25 on: May 04, 2014, 08:52:39 AM »
It's a shame we can't put an alarm on the this one, to ring in a couple of years to come back to it to see if there are any voles left and/or if they have built up numbers.

Because if there were so few when the BAP was written and there were 40-60 to take now, then they must procreate in sufficient numbers for us to be able to tell.
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline I Could Do That

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2014, 10:44:36 PM »
Just been cleaning up a PC and found some notes for this  thread.
I never did get any reply back from Natural England.

I'll leave the notes in the PC.

Wonder if there are any water voles in Wichelstowe now  :(
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Offline I Could Do That

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2014, 08:09:24 AM »
It will be interesting to see if any water voles return from Hampshire now that the Wilts and Berks canal trust have been given a boost

www.swindonadvertiser.co.uk/news/11634436.Canal_Trust_s_joy_over_lottery_cash/?action=success#comments

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A FORMER landfill site will be turned into a wildlife haven after the Wilts and Berks Canal Trus won £50,000 of lottery cash in a TV vote.


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“They will also be monitoring the site for the return of the water vole, an endangered species.


Why don't they just return those that were removed ?   :wakeup:

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"On a 560m (1,840ft) section of canal, we assumed a population of around 45 to 50 voles and caught around 40 animals - which is a decent number."
(major under-statement!!)

In weeks, 40 voles were captured, along with 20 more on an old section of canal running through Studley Grange. (Junction 16 garden centre)


So 20 of them came from the very site where they are hoping for a return of the water vole  :bash:

Hmmm???
Roland Rat used to drive a car (Ford Popular)
I think the water voles might require the same "taxi" that took them to their doom relocation if they are to return
« Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 08:43:43 AM by I Could Do That »
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Offline Muggins

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #28 on: November 30, 2014, 09:21:59 AM »
Obviously a whole £50,000 isn't going to be spent on watching for the return of the Water Voles, but it does seem odd.

So in their bid, I wonder how they said they would a monitor the hope they will return? How would they know that they are the same voles or their offspring that are returning? 

Did they mention the so recent moving of the voles in their bid?

Did anyone else know there was an old landfill site at Studley Grange?



 
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline Jean

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #29 on: November 30, 2014, 10:46:02 AM »
Did anyone else know there was an old landfill site at Studley Grange?

Yes, indeed! Run by Biffa but now only in the restoration stage. I know it, as the landfill site came within yards of a Richard Jefferies Society member's house. He had lived there since about 1960 but died this year from prostate cancer (and I do wonder if there is a link). He was convinced that the landfill operations had caused major changes to ground-water flows as in the last decade or so his house suffered really badly from subsidence and the spring fed pond in his garden started to regularly dry up in the summer.

The Wilts and Berks Canal skirts the landfill site and his land. If the canal is restored, I'm not sure that the water quality in the canal will be good enough to support the return of water-voles until all the leachates from the infill have diluted/dispersed.   
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Offline I Could Do That

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #30 on: November 28, 2015, 01:46:51 AM »
And there it is.

SBC's lack of joined up thinking.

http://www.swindonadvertiser.co.uk/news/14106795.Bringing_wildlife_back_to_Swindon_stream_with___15k_boost/?action=success#comment_14987428

Now looking to encourage water voles to move in to Whitehill
After sending them to death camps last year


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Offline I Could Do That

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #31 on: November 28, 2015, 06:56:04 PM »
Sorry about typo on the link.

This link should work

http://www.swindonadvertiser.co.uk/news/14106795.Bringing_wildlife_back_to_Swindon_stream_with___15k_boost/


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THOUSANDS of pounds are being sunk into a new restoration and conservation project at Whitehill Stream as diggers moved on to the site this week.

With the aid of a £15,000 grant from the Environment Agency, new flood mitigation works are being done in conjunction with the creation of a new habitat for wildlife in the area.

The team from the Wiltshire Wildlife Trust and Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group South West are carrying out the works to reduce the potential for flash floods by increasing the storage capacity in sections of the stream between the Rivermead Industrial Estate and Barnfield Sewage Treatment Works.

New and diverse wildlife will be attracted to the area, it is hoped, by extending the capacity of the stream, allowing areas previously left dry to be more amenable to certain species of animal.

Jenny Phelps, the senior conservation adviser at the Farming and Wildlife Academy Group South West, said there is the potential to reintroduce the water vole and great-crested newt to the area.

“We have duties to protect our resources and a duty to deliver the best quality in our rivers,” she said.

“Swindon Borough Council suggested a project which might be of interest in the local area. The plan put forward is restoration of a storage area of Whitehill Stream.



"We are aware there is a skate park in the area of Rivermead, and the main focus is going to be on the impact of flood storage capacity.

“I have been alerted to a few things that might be affecting the function of the stream.

"We want to take what could be a lovely area and enhance it for wildlife and flood storage.

“We have a budget of £15,000, and allocated most funding to Wiltshire Wildlife Trust, who will work closely with Swindon Borough Council.

“The aim is to do a small amount of work which would make the river flow more naturally. We want to try and enhance the area so water has the chance to flow, and enabling wildlife and flora and fauna.

“Our habitat survey has already been conducted, and the project will help the borough fulfil its obligations for the natural environment and as a flood authority for Biodiversity 2020.

“Carrying out practical enhancements on the river and tributaries through the flood storage area will help deliver good ecological status, improve flood storage, enhance biodiversity and have public benefit as an amenity asset that will become an enhanced green space in Swindon.”

“The River Ray and its tributaries is currently failing to achieve Good Ecological Status, which is due in part to poor phosphate status.

"The river and tributaries show poor habitat quality, lack of hydromorpholical diversity, and disconnection from the floodplain have also been identified as factors limiting the achievement of GES in the water-body.

“These are the factors this project aims to address. Long sections of the channels are heavily shaded by tree growth. This in turn is leading to bank erosion, and will be a limiting factor on the abundance and diversity of fish and invertebrate populations.

"The rivers are of limited amenity value due to the poor channel quality and visual shielding from heavy vegetation.

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“The flood storage area does not function effectively due to the Whitehill stream being deeply incised. This limits its effectiveness in reducing the ‘flashy’ nature of the water-body and project may help to reduce flood risk.

"Remaining dry for long periods also reduces the areas potential wildlife value and allows the area to attract inappropriate use and anti-social behaviour."
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Offline Spunkymonkey

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #32 on: November 28, 2015, 10:32:03 PM »
Now looking to encourage water voles to move in to Whitehill
After sending them to death camps last year

The two things are unrelated, but both make sense to me.

Reintroducing or encouraging water voles at Whitehill Stream is surely a good thing.

Moving them at Wichelstowe was the lesser of two evils and is actually quite a common occurrence. As a bridge engineer, I come across this all the time. If you have water vole burrows near to a bridge, you can't erect scaffolding or use heavy construction plant without a risk of crushing the burrows. You can't ignore the bridge and let it fall down unless you intend to hurt people and still risk crushing the burrows. So you employ a qualified ecologist to trap and move the water voles, carry out the work and then bring the voles back when the work is complete.

In the case of bridges, we can often displace them rather than physically trap them. Bridge sites are quite small, so we can strim back vegetation leaving voles exposed to encourage them to move downstream. Once the work is finished, the vegetation grows back and the voles return. This wouldn't be possible for a housing development occupying a much larger area and taking longer to complete. In these cases, the voles are removed.

Water voles are actually very common in the South West of England.

As for sending them to death camps, life for a water vole isn't Wind in the Willows or a rosy Disney cartoon. According to the Wild Wood Trust -

In captivity water voles have a life span of up to three years but in the wild they only live for about five months, mainly due to predation. American mink are not the only predator faced by water voles; weasels, stoats, otters, foxes, cats, owls, herons and pike will all take water voles.

It seems that if you are a water vole everywhere is a potential death camp.


Offline I Could Do That

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2015, 04:38:32 PM »
Quote
So you employ a qualified ecologist to trap and move the water voles, carry out the work and then bring the voles back when the work is complete.

 

That's the point I was trying to make.
They released them in an area where they had already been wiped out by predators.
They didn't bring them back.
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Offline Spunkymonkey

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2015, 11:06:51 PM »
That's the point I was trying to make.
They released them in an area where they had already been wiped out by predators.
They didn't bring them back.

On average they live to a ripe old age of 5 months. They don't bring the same ones back. Presumably, when the time is right they will bring some back.

The ecologists will be looking for a suitable habitat. Not sure if they would take predators into account as they are part of the ecosystem.

I understand why you think Wichelstowe is a negative, but I don't understand why you are treating Whitehill as negative or attempting to link two entirely different events. Licences to move water voles are granted by English Nature. Nothing to do with SBC.

They are about 900,000 water voles in the UK. That is 6 water voles for every Romanian. Apparently one are endangered and we are over run with the other.

Offline I Could Do That

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Re: Endangered Species Sent To Death Camps
« Reply #35 on: November 30, 2015, 08:52:09 AM »
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.I understand why you think Wichelstowe is a negative, but I don't understand why you are treating Whitehill as negative

I don't think Whitehill is a negative

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or attempting to link two entirely different events.

I'm suggesting the two events should have been linked

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Licences to move water voles are granted by English Nature. Nothing to do with SBC.

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Swindon Borough Council suggested a project which might be of interest in the local area


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