Author Topic: The rising tide of litter and vegatation  (Read 5237 times)

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Offline Tea Boy

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The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« on: April 06, 2013, 03:05:57 PM »
I ve just driven through town with a friend who moved out of Swindon a few back.

He couldn't believe just how bad the towns image has fallen. From Moredon through Rodbourne past Steam and into the outlet all he could comment on was litter on the verges, in the gutters, in the shrubs, hanging from trees and blowing down pavements.

Also overgrown shrubberies and lack of any cheerful flower beds.

Problem is he's right the towns gone to shit in a hand cart and it seems no one on the council gives a toss either way. It's all so depressing given that for years the now redundant parks dept was so well regarded.

At least I used to be able to say Swindon was good for its open spaces. Now that only applies if the said open space is too small to wedge a few houses on.


How far have we fallen.


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Offline Terry Reynolds

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2013, 04:22:26 PM »
if you have time, have a ride around the road called meadowcroft, looks like an extension of the tip....

Offline Richard Symonds

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2013, 06:05:09 PM »
Hey TB have you been to Shaw recently?

Litter everywhere and we have the dubious privilege of a Deputy Mayor and two Cabinet Members for representation.  If they can't or won't get things done who will?

I am told by a Councillor from another ward on which I said it was a mess he commented that with all the cuts that are being made we cannot expect anything better and in fact it can only get worse.

So for what do we pay our Council Tax then? 

You may well ask - but paying for a non attending Committee Chairman doesn't help does it

Empty the fecking bins as Mart would say.
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Offline Muggins

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2013, 06:52:05 PM »
Same here, and it's not people dropping it, I've done enough litter pick ups to know the difference, it's left over after bin day, some on the green bit up from our house has been there since before the deep snow we had.

Today I did my bit and cleared along one small stretch of hedgerow.

Particularly bad is along the hedgerow around the elderly persons dwelling 'Les Gowing House' as well as litter is, at regular intervals, dog pooh, obviously done by one day on several days. 

One thing that worries me is the amount of grit on our roads, grit from where newly repaired potholes have popped out already. I just know the grit is going to get in the land drains and block them up.  I can't remember a time when it looked so bleak and messy.

I'd try and organsie a street litter pick, but what's the point when it will be like it again next week?

But if you want to see a real mess, pop into the Penhill Orchard where a sewer has been overflowing for three weeks and see the work done by Thames Water to get rid of the resulting mess. But note how litter free it is!
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline jennyb

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2013, 07:35:11 PM »
I have lived in Swindon since 1983.

My family have visited me since that time and used to remark on how well the town was kept and the flowers etc.,

They have recently been for a visit and remarked on how run down Swindon looks.

They didn't even bother to go into the town centre.

It is not good.

I believe that government cutbacks and banking crises affect all of us.

Other towns don't seem to be showing the same air of neglect.

So why are we?
It takes wisdom to know what you know and wisdom to know what you don't know and when to call in those who do. Often the people who do know will advise that evidence and research are very helpful when making decisions. Who knows it might even save a bit of money.

Offline Muggins

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2013, 08:35:09 PM »
Because it was worse than other towns to start with?
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline jennyb

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2013, 09:58:40 PM »
Because it was worse than other towns to start with?

Nope, sorry don't buy that.
It takes wisdom to know what you know and wisdom to know what you don't know and when to call in those who do. Often the people who do know will advise that evidence and research are very helpful when making decisions. Who knows it might even save a bit of money.

Offline Muggins

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2013, 08:13:51 AM »
No real excuse up here though Jennyb, where we have the benefit of Street Wardens.

I know their job is not all about street cleaning, but at least they could do that bit along Les Gowing House Hedgerow. 

If I can see it they can!

The fact is that year on year, worker jobs have been cut - going back at least ten years, our front line services HAVE NOT improved and those cut backs are now showing.
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline the gorgon

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2013, 09:49:56 AM »
Litter basically breeds litter because when people see litter they are far more likely to drop litter ("because the place was a mess already").

That's why having people to clean the streets is important or failing that just get people to hand out £75 fines for dropping litter - they'll soon get the message.

Offline Muggins

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2013, 12:02:19 PM »
100% absolutely agree - based on experience!
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline Spunkymonkey

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2013, 01:06:59 PM »
The fact is that year on year, worker jobs have been cut - going back at least ten years, our front line services HAVE NOT improved and those cut backs are now showing.

So true, but if people took more pride in their community and didn't drop litter in the first place we wouldn't need street cleaners at all.

Offline Tobes

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2013, 03:10:11 PM »
There's only really one possible response.

An increase in council tax to pay to put these things right. Now, who is going to propose to do that now, during the middle of the longest lasting recession of the past 100 years?

Until someone grasps that nettle, scoring political points looks as ridiculously irrelevant as it is tiresomely predictable.

Quote
So true, but if people took more pride in their community and didn't drop litter in the first place we wouldn't need street cleaners at all.

Yup. I've been shocked to see chavlings throwing their discard on the floor quite openly in Wharf Green. If people want to live in a cess pit, it'll happen soon enough, I guess.

Its true the town centre and the road sides are looking more down-at-heel than ever. A tribute to all the previously unrecognised hard work from those that tended them. The next part of the double whammy will be in the next few seasons as the effects of the cuts start getting noticed in the parks.  :(

 Old Town is having something of a recent renaissance (another two new businesses about to open on Devizes Road, I noticed today). With the majority of quality independent traders up this end of town, I wonder if we're seeing the extension of a real social divide opening up? Not necessarily a good thing for the town overall if that happens...

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Offline Richard Symonds

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2013, 04:19:21 PM »
The fact is that year on year, worker jobs have been cut - going back at least ten years, our front line services HAVE NOT improved and those cut backs are now showing.

So true, but if people took more pride in their community and didn't drop litter in the first place we wouldn't need street cleaners at all.

Don't they teach that at school under the subject of Citizenship?

If not they should!

Now in my day if we messed up the school we were held back from going home until we tidied it up.  Now any teacher doing that would be banged up for unlawful imprisonment.  Not a change for the better, sadly.
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Offline Tobes

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2013, 04:28:19 PM »
Quote
Don't they teach that at school under the subject of Citizenship?

If not they should!

Now in my day if we messed up the school we were held back from going home until we tidied it up.  Now any teacher doing that would be banged up for unlawful imprisonment.  Not a change for the better, sadly.

... Agreed. And without wanting to go all Daily Mail, maybe some real enforcement consequence for those for those littering too would't go amiss either... Another better use of CCTV than bloody bus lane enforcement...?
I do not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it - [attributed to] Voltaire... 'Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessita' - William of Occam.... 'You have a right to feel offended, but just cos you are offended doesn't mean you are right'

Offline the gorgon

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2013, 05:03:47 PM »
Remember this case? http://www.swindonadvertiser.co.uk/news/8184768.Littering_pair_are_hit_with___80_fine/  (two smokers who didn't pay their littering fine and ended up in court)

Just look at some of the comments section posters, some people were going as far as declaring the fines as stalinist  :idiot2:

Idiots who drop litter...
Idiots who don't think you have to pay fines...
Idiots who think it's not fair fining people for dropping litter...

I give up.

Offline Mart

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2013, 05:13:55 PM »
When I was ickle I don't think I had that many things that created litter, if you think about it's true.

No MaccybloodyD, sweeties weekly, if that, you got money back on bottles, not just your own we realised as we circulated bottles around the village, no Greggs, no Costafeckinfortune and just what is in that foam?

I'm trying to remember if carrier bags were about, I do remember being sent to scuffle for boxes in the supermarket so maybe not.

The reason we see more litter is that it is more accessible than in the olden days, oh, and a higher proportion of society are ignorant gits.

This pretty much covers a bit of it.

Half Man Half Biscuit - Breaking News Small | Large
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Offline Muggins

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2013, 05:57:32 PM »
The fact is that year on year, worker jobs have been cut - going back at least ten years, our front line services HAVE NOT improved and those cut backs are now showing.

So true, but if people took more pride in their community and didn't drop litter in the first place we wouldn't need street cleaners at all.

Certainly around here SpunkyM, it is not so much the litter louts, as it is the residue from bin days. And people who think they can put old furniture out for the bin men.

Theres a path that runs around the back of our street, down, out of the way, the kids call it the Jungle Path, it's not tarmac and borders the Nature Reserve. It was one of our first jobs as a Group to cut our way through it and clean up as we went, we picked out 40 years of stuff that had been over thrown over the fences - ignorance, so we 'educated' people, and it stopped overnight, except for a few, and it was Soooo plain to see which few. 

Anyway, that's history, we've litter picked along there many times and that was 'litter'  cans, bottles (some of them broken) fag packets, crisp packets, the odd left overs a picnic in a plastic carrier bag.  Sweet wrappers, more cans, more fag packets even fag ends.

We've had a few exciting finds like a full brief case and more than one cash tin - then we started cleaning the stream between Penhill and what is now Abbey Meads - now that's a corker! 

I can tell you we filled quite a few skips in our time. (At the time a free service from our council by way of encouragment) And for your amusement, we had to have them delivered on the day of the advertised clear up and have someone standing by them when they were delivered, because on more than one occasion they were deliverd at 9am and half full by 9.30am with cast off white good items. Some of them down in Greenmeadow aren't as good as they like to think they are!  We also had what we called the Utterly Butterly gang, who put left over food out so say to feed wild animals, but never tidied up their butter cartons, so any clean up started with 100 Utterly Butterly cartons.
Even when caught in the act this person absolutely refused to stop doing it.

When you get involved in this sort of activity you soon start to tell the difference between someone throwing a bit of litter over their shoulder and the other sort.

 
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline Spunkymonkey

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2013, 09:40:54 PM »
Muggins, the bit about the skip doesn't surprise me. I work in the construction industry and on a recent job, a push chair was deposited in a skip within 30 minutes of it being delivered. There must have been 8 workmen on site, but the Phantom Dumper managed to sneak in unnoticed.

In a former life, I was a bridge inspector and used to find all sorts in the streams and brooks around the borough. Pushchairs, push bikes, motorbikes (several of these complete with oil slicks), shopping trolleys, arm chairs, umbrellas, childrens toys, etc.  :fish:

Out of interest, do you know if the section of brook near to Chatsworth Road/Hardwick Close in Abbeymeads flooded in 2007. I am house hunting at the moment and have seen a property in that area.

Offline Muggins

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2013, 09:04:54 AM »
Yep, to the stream thing, probably when you were instpecting bridges, we were cleaning up around them. Not the first time I have dragged a trolley out and pushed it back to ASDA, dripping with weed, twigs and the odd bag attached, sometimes so rusty it hardly moved. Haaa, them were the days (sigh)

I've been rescuing umbrellas for 30 years, and taking the silks off them and I fully intend to make something from them one day.

As far as I know the Haydon Brook as never flooded between 7f's and  Haydon Wick, I can check, Rochelle may come on and say, she lives down there.

There is a lot of anti-flood work going on at the Haydon Wick end, which looks dreadful at the moment and as it happens I had cause to ring a parish councillor last week to see what he knew about the way it was being done. He says there are photos' and plans up in the parish rooms and suggested I make an appointment to go and see them.  You can look on the Environment Agency web site for any house you are thinking of buying, the flood risks are clearly marked.

A good idea might be to have a walk along it to re-assure yourself.

Personally I think what they are doing to Haydon Brook is over kill, all the land drains flow into it and it runs from 7F's towards Haydon Wick, so it would have to back up quite a lot to flood badly by Chatsworth, Hardwicke.(First houses built on Abbey Meads you know?)

When we've worked by the Brook in 7F's, we noticed that it would run faster and higher in a storm and then almost immediately go back down to it's normal level, which is not at all deep.  At a point in (I think) Elsham Way, it is joined by the *Groundwell Brook which runs along the bottom of Penhill valley and rises from a Spring at Groundwell, where they found the Roman Quarry,  unless that gets bunged up with rubbish I can't see that overflowing.

For Bob - *Gryndewelles Facu, means made by the people of Groundwell.  When our Dentist (Seven Fields Dental) moved to Groundwell Farmhouse, they had the history written up, I think that's on their web page and I know the same has been done for the Manor Farm pub, but have not seen it.
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline Spunkymonkey

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Re: The rising tide of litter and vegatation
« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2013, 09:30:28 PM »
As far as I know the Haydon Brook as never flooded between 7f's and  Haydon Wick, I can check, Rochelle may come on and say, she lives down there.

You can look on the Environment Agency web site for any house you are thinking of buying, the flood risks are clearly marked.

Thanks Muggins.

My girlfriend lives in Haydon Wick and didn't think that area flooded. The EA website shows it as a significant risk, so I assume that the cost of insurance would be high. The house in question is at the top end (possibly over) our budget, so we won't be making any rash decisions.