Author Topic: Maggots in wheelie bins  (Read 27799 times)

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Offline Bogomil

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #40 on: July 08, 2010, 11:35:52 PM »
Yes but cook them slowly otherwise they wrinkle up, go hard and get stuck between your teeth


Quote
Fly larvae - or maggots - are rich in calories and protein. Scoop them off decomposed meat, wash in cold water, boil and they're ready to eat. 'In the natural, they are easy to capture and often found in clusters in such places as road kill,' advises one source.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A476859

and who say's the council don't care about providing for the needy....

The councils current refuse collection policy can provide ton's of free food.  :azn:

Offline Mart

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #41 on: July 09, 2010, 10:40:15 PM »
Hello, me again.

I have been the proud owner of a wheelie bin for 3 months now, and bang on schedule, it has been emptied at least twice. No issues there then.

All of our waste is bagged, and I run two compost bins for the stuff that composts. I can confirm, after extensive field trials plastic bottles do not after all compost. Maybe I'll give it another couple of thousand years. I do use the plastic bottles not on field trials to attach lickle plastic dribblers for my growbags ('no watering for a week' my shapely arse) We have never had so little waste and I probably only open the wheelie bin a couple of times a week.

Imagine my surprise and delight then to find a bumper crop of maggots today, it was a regular party scene in there. I have not, to my certain knowledge, inadvertently crapped in the wheelie bin. I have secreted no rotting corpses in the wheelie bin nor have I erected any signage inviting larvae, of any variety to party in my waste receptacle. The lid is closed with the exception of perhaps 2  cumulative minutes per solar cycle or whatever the bloody collection schedule is now. (That said when they do turn up they are very swift, neat and considerate. The binmen not the larvae, do try to keep up)

My considered opinion is that whoever said that blah blah yackety patronising yackety yak wheelie bins are saving the planet and biannual collections make polar bears breed like rabbits is a bleedin tosser who knows nothing, or has not been blessed with a wheelie bin.

My wheelie bin has now been nuked with a chemical cocktail that has probably destroyed all insect life for several miles and has almost certainly wreaked havoc on the internal workings of my knackers.

Empty my feckin bin.
Sometimes I think you have to march right in and demand your rights, even if you don’t know what your rights are, or who the person is you’re talking to. Then, on the way out, slam the door.

Offline Muggins

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #42 on: July 10, 2010, 08:24:22 AM »
Ref plastic bottle Mart, have you considered making them into a greenhouse for your allotment?   I have a diagram of how to do it here somehwere and one of my gardening friends who doubted it would work, saw it made up at working at the Chelsea Flower Show and was greatly impressed.

Thinking of making myself a lean-to with them, cheaper than a conservatory and no planning permission. 
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline Mart

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #43 on: July 10, 2010, 09:19:22 AM »
Yup, saw that.

Aesthetically a bit disastrous, you'll also be 94 stone, no teeth and have a kidney disorder to get enough for a 6 x 4 job. I also have reservations of the likely outcome if wolves try it on with some huffing and puffing, but the double glazing type effect is interesting and you do wonder about ways you might be able to do some sort of irrigating thing.

I have stopped throwing plastic bottles away for now as they are useful buggers. I am currently fashioning a pair of glasses with them, I reason they will be substantially lighter that the milk bottle bottoms I am currently using. Early attempts to make contact lenses have been abandoned as they were a little scratchy on the eyeball.

I have found them to be very disappointing as cooking vessels and they have not really made the grade as clothing.


http://www.reapscotland.org.uk/reports/greenhouse%20v1.pdf

Sometimes I think you have to march right in and demand your rights, even if you don’t know what your rights are, or who the person is you’re talking to. Then, on the way out, slam the door.

Offline Bogomil

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #44 on: July 10, 2010, 09:49:21 AM »
Mart

this might give you a few ideas and I think if we all worked hard enough we might make a few boats for the Bluh and Co so sail away in

http://uk.green.yahoo.com/blog/daily_green_news/18/the-seven-coolest-things-made-from-recycled-bottles.html

Offline moley

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #45 on: July 10, 2010, 10:22:17 AM »
This thread reminds me of something that happened when I was at university..  People in the art department bought a load of Evian bottles, tipped out all the water and built a viking longboat out of bottles.  Several people then did paintings of it, and it was dismantled and the bottles chucked in a skip (this predated recycling).

But I can't think of many worse examples of futile resource consumption...  (and this reinforced many prejudices about "art" which I still have today).

Moley


Offline Muggins

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #46 on: July 10, 2010, 07:11:36 PM »
Being someone who has always had plenty of time on her hands, (and not much money) I have made plant incubation units out of them, cut 3 sides of square on the sides, bend it back like a little door , fill the bottom with soil and put in plantlet, water and shut the little door, stand by and await growth!   

I also remember cutting the bottoms of loads of them and pushing one in the other to form a tube for some reason I can't remember.

You can make bird feeders out of them too.  But in the end you still have to throw them away.   They reckon that if Henry V111 had chucked his crisp packet over his real tennis court wall, it would still not have degraded.

Could anyone use a load of black plant pots?  At the moment they are providing bug sanctuary in my garden.
Oi! Listen mush. Old eyes, remember? I’ve been around the block a few times. More than a few. They’ve knocked down the blocks I’ve been around and rebuilt them as bigger blocks. Super blocks. And I’ve been round them as well.  The Doctor (Night Terrors)

Offline Tea Boy

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Re: Maggots in wheelie bins
« Reply #47 on: July 10, 2010, 10:25:25 PM »
Being someone who has always had plenty of time on her hands, (and not much money) I have made plant incubation units out of them, cut 3 sides of square on the sides, bend it back like a little door , fill the bottom with soil and put in plantlet, water and shut the little door, stand by and await growth!   

I also remember cutting the bottoms of loads of them and pushing one in the other to form a tube for some reason I can't remember.

You can make bird feeders out of them too.  But in the end you still have to throw them away.   They reckon that if Henry V111 had chucked his crisp packet over his real tennis court wall, it would still not have degraded.

Could anyone use a load of black plant pots?  At the moment they are providing bug sanctuary in my garden.

Try the jubilee garden project at purton
Gardening tips: Always remember its brown side down, green side up.  If its knocking now it'll only go bang later